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The Fallacious Premise of the Ketogenic Diet 
 
The problem with the Keto diet is not that it doesn't work, it does for many people, it is that there is a fallacious premise at the root at the diet. The fallacy is that advocates of the diet state that glucose- derived from carbohydrates is not the prefered fuel source for the body, when in fact it is the preferred source of energy. To see why, look at hospitals- what do they put in IV's? Fats?? no, they put a glucose solution. Why? Because this is essential for the body's metabolic processes.
I'm not saying the keto diet won't work for some people, just that carbohydrates are the prefered energy source- this isn't even debatable. Will the body convert fats- and protein- to glucose? Yes- but that isn't the point. ANY macronutrients eaten in excess will convert to fat. Is the diet good? For some people, yes. But not for bodybuilders or people looking to reach peak condition. The more extreme keto advocates  recommend a 5% carbohydrate intake on the keto diet- 5% carbs is very low. This figure might figure into a crash weight loss diet or for an obese person trying to get into reasonable condition.
For a bodybuilder, strength athlete or someone trying to optimize lean mass and size, it's a mistake. Here's why. "Hydrate" literally means "with water". Carbo- hydrates bind with water molecules and if carbohydrate intake is sufficient they wil carry the water into the muscle cell- (a "volumizing" effect) making them full and round. Insufficient carbohydrates will leave you with smooth, smaller and flat muscles. -Quoting- paraphrasing really, here from "Heavy Duty Journal" by Mr Universe Mike Mentzer- the first man to ever get a perfect 300 score in international competition on contest preparation and nutrition.

The problem with the Keto diet is not that it doesn't work, it does for many people, it is that there is a fallacious premsie at the root at the diet. The fallacy is that advocates of the diet state that glucose- derived from carbohydrates is not hte prefered fuel source for the body, when in fact it is the preferred source of energy. To see why, look at hospitals- what do they put in IV's? Fats?? No, they put a glucose solution. Why? Because this is essential for the body's metabolic processes.
I'm not saying the keto diet won't work for some people, just that carbohydrates are the prefered energy source- this isn't even debatable. Will the body convert fats- and protein- to glucose? Yes- but that isn't the point. ANY macronutrients eaten in excess will convert to fat. Is the diet good? For some people, yes. Some people recommend a 5% carohydrate intake on the keto diet- 5% carbs is very low. This figure might figure into a crash weigt loss diet or for an obese person trying to get into reasonable condition.
For a bodybuilder, strength athlete or someone trying to optimize lean mass and size, it's a mistake. Here's why. "Hydrate" literally means "with water". Carbo- hydrates bind with water molecules and if carbohydrate intake is sufficient they will carry the water into the muscle cell- (a "volumizing" effect) making them full and round. Insufficient carbohydrates will leave you with smooth, smaller and flat muscles.

Note: The Ketogenic diet has been effective in short term weight loss, especially for endomorphic individuals. 

Copyright 2004 James Vandervest

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